State of the blogosphere

David Sifry, CEO and founder of Technorati, has posted an interesting article in April about the state of the blogosphere. He also posted a follow-up article in the month of May 2006.

Here is are a few numbers from the article in question:

The blogosphere is over 60 times bigger than it was only 3 years ago.

New blog creation continues to grow. Technorati currently tracks over 75,000 new weblogs created every day, which means that on average, a new weblog is created every second of every day – and 19.4 million bloggers (55%) are still posting 3 months after their blogs are created. That’s an increase both absolute and relative terms over just 3 months ago, when only 50.5% or 13.7 million blogs were active. In other words, even though there’s a reasonable amount of tire-kicking going on, blogging continues to grow as a habitual activity.

In addition to that, about 3.9 million bloggers update their blogs at least weekly

In his second article, that was published in May, he continues his analysis of the blogosphere. He mentions that Technorati is probably under representing the Korean and French blogosphere. And that Japanese bloggers post shorter blogs due to moblogging.

Terminology

From Wikipedia’s entry on spings:

Sping is short for ‘spam ping‘, and is related to fraudulent pings from blogs using trackbacks, called trackback spam. Pings are messages sent from blog and publishing tools to a centralized network service (Ping Server) providing notification of newly published posts or content. Spings, or ping spam, are pings that are sent from spam blogs, or are sometimes multiple pings in a short interval from a legitimate source, often tens or hundreds per minute, due to misconfigured software, or a wish to make the content coming from the source appear fresh.

Spings, like spam blogs are increasingly problematic for the blogosphere. Estimates from Dave Winer‘s Weblogs.com and Matt Mullenweg‘s Ping-o-Matic! service have put the sping rate — the percentage of pings that are sent from spam blogs — well above 50%. A study from Ebiquity Group, UMBC confirms that these numbers are around 75%.

The term was coined by David Sifry from Technorati in his February 2006 State of the Blogosphere report.

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1 Response to “State of the blogosphere”


  1. 1 Petrovich May 7, 2008 at 10:35 am

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